August, what are you doing?

11 August 2019

Yesterday, today and tomorrow we had planned to go and dive on Gun Rocks, to sort out the trail, cut back the kelp and possibly add in a new section of rope. But alas, the weather gods have not been fair to us. Due to the works on the pier at Seahouses, the rhib has to be launched at Beadnell, off the beach by tractor. But when the forecast is for a 1.5 – 2m swell, this option becomes a little less favourable.

So it is with a heavy heart that we had to cancel the weekend of diving. Instead the days have been spent updating this and the Tyneside BSAC 114 website as well as catching up on other admin tasks.

Ken Crow from NORFED has been in touch and has provided us with some footage from the 1970s, with Peter Lumley diving Gun Rocks. Apparently the uploaded clip is only a short section of a longer movie, put together by members of Bradford BSAC. The clip can be found on the media page. Ken is going to contact Bradford BSAC on hour behalf, to inquire about the longer film.

The ongoing hope is that we can get out and do some metal detecting on the cannon site, before the season ends. Fingers crossed!

2019 Trail Clearing in Progress

Simon cleaning kelp from the cannon

A team of intrepid divers set out on the 26th May 2019 in the rhib to visit Gun Rocks to clear the trail, install the marker buoy and check the trail ropes. The forecast wasn’t the best, but we hoped to get at least one dive in before the wind built up. In addition to which, the tide would be on the ebb most of the day, but with an early arrival, the site should be diveable. The ebb tide runs south to north, so the rocks of Gun Rocks do not shelter the site from the current. Flood or slack is the best time to dive the site, however needs must. 

We arrived at the site on high tide, all rocks covered, but were able to shot the main site. Descending down the line with the new buoy in tow, Simon tied it in so there is now a new shot (with a can on top) marking the site. The previous one washed off last year. The site was looking so overgrown, it took a bit of time to get our bearings. How fast the kelp grows, its unbelievable! So out came our knives, just to take the kelp off the cannon, so they can be seen, and a little bit from either side of the trail lines. 

Andy, Fiona and Andy getting ready to go diving.

The trail remained intact all winter. The blue rope is now quite faded, but still can be seen on the seabed. Hopefully now, after a full and frantic hour of trail clearing, it will  be much clearer to see and easier to follow. More work is needed though, those pesky kelp plants (Saccharina latissima, Laminaria hyperborea, Laminaria digitata and Saccorhiza polyschides) do grow quite rapidly and had already covered most surfaces (stone and metal).

By the time we came up and back on to the rhib, the tide had quickened and the swell increased. This meant that the second wave of divers could not dive Gun Rocks, to continue the clean up. Instead we sought shelter along the cliffs and the three divers were dropped on to the St Andre – a great all weather wreck dive. 

Unfortunately, the problem we have now is that my car has died, so I have had to get a new one,  small enough not to get “done” by the upcoming clean ear charge in Newcastle. So basically it has no tow bar and couldn’t tow the rhib anyway. Hmm, what to do? For now, this means that the trail will remain as is, until we can return to finish the kelp removal, and as i have hoped to do in August, get some metal detecting done on the site, to see what else lies down there. Unless someone with a tow bar on their car wants to help us…..

Carl and Melissa visit the Finspång museum in Sweden

In October 2018 two of our club members, Melissa and Carl went over to Sweden to visit Carl’s family, while there, they went to visit the Finspång museum to find out more about where some of the cannon  found on Gun Rocks were made. While there they met a very friendly museum guide, who gave them many facts and figures about the cannon. For a summary of this information read on… amply illustrated with some lovely photographs!

The Finspång Foundry

The first industries were established in Finspång in 1580 when a factory for cannon and cannon balls was chartered. The industry was to continue for 300 years. The Finspång foundry was one of the largest in Sweden, originally owned by the royal family; but in 1618, the foundry was gifted to Dutch nobleman and merchant Louis De Geer. He and his descendants continued to run the foundry for the next few hundred years and shipped cannons all over Europe. The cannons were sent to The Netherlands for distribution by sea, a potential explanation as to why Swedish cannons were found on a Dutch ship.

Cannon similar to those at Gun Rocks

Above is a model cannon, of similar type to those found at gun rocks. Do note the ‘ears’ also known as trunnions, on the side of the cannon. These are used to mount it, and allow it to pivot up and down while on its mount. This cannon was designed for use on land. It has wheels so can be moved around. 

Cannon without trunnions

The picture above is of a specifically designed marine grade cannon. Note the lack of ears or trunnions on the side. For cannon which were stationary and used on ships, they often were made without trunnions/ears. This was usually to save space on the crowded deck. In addition, as these cannon would be stationary on deck, their mounts have no wheels.

Cannon for use on sea and land

The two images above show a cannon made in the same foundry, with ears or trunnions for mounting. Also note the notch on the back which means the cannon could be used both on land and at sea. For use at sea, the notch would be used to secure a rope. This would prevent the cannon rolling back from recoil, if it was mounted with wheels.

The small museum

The museum in the foundry

Gun Rocks presentation at NAS 2018 Conference

Over the two  days, attendees at the Nautical Archaeology Society 2018 Conference presented a multitude of fascinating presentations from individuals and groups, highlighting the  recent innovations and ground-breaking work being undertaken in the field of maritime archaeology, and updating members with fascinating finds and incredible projects. I learned about a range of projects being undertaken across the UK, with much emphasis on recording data, to enable retrieval and access by interested parties, using the internet.

One project which really stood out is the Forgotten Wrecks of the First World War project by the Maritime Archaeology Trust. They have created a huge data-base, with lots of wreck information in it. The project funding is coming to a close, but it would be brilliant if the data-base could be expanded upon, to include wrecks around the country and of different ages. A huge resource!

The Gun Rocks talk was given at 11 am on the Sunday Morning, and was televised on the Nautical Archaeology Society YouTube channel. You can watch it HERE! The talk seemed to be well received, which is great, even being mentioned in the summing up at the end of the Conference. Following the talk, the creation of this website seemed to peak quite a bit of interest too, so if you are reading this, and have questions about how I set up the website, do ask! 

Nic Faulks – NAS conference 2018

Duke of Cambridge Scuba Award Winners 2018!

Wow, what a day! On Tuesday 6th November Team Gun Rocks, represented by Nic Faulks, Si Smith and Peta Knott, took a trip to Kensington Palace, to meet Prince William and to receive the DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE SCUBA AWARD! We had known about the award for 6 weeks or so but were sworn to secrecy. This meant as excited as we were, we could only tell close friends and family.

It was a hard decision to make, who we should take. So many people have given their time to the project. In the end we decided to go with the core of the group, but we won’t forget how much input the project has had from club members, other BSAC members, divers from other agencies and non-divers too.

So how did the day unfold? We all met at the entrance gate at 1345 to sign in. I had to have another photograph taken as the one I sent through previously they had put on my ID badge up-side down! We met everyone else representing BSAC, Jubilee Trust and the two teams that were highly commended. After 20 minutes we were lead through into the Palace room. There was a short brief on how the greeting would work, what we should call him, if we should shake his hand…. Prince William then entered. He greeted everyone, then chatted to the Gun Rocks group for about 10 minutes, finding out all about the project. Peta had come prepared and showed him a video on her ipad of the website, photos and 3D models. I gave him a copy of the dive trail maps and leaflets. We were then presented with the award. After a few more photographs, he left, of to more meetings.

Although we were only in the Palace for an hour, it was a fantastic experience. The atmosphere in the Palace is amazing, very formal, but relaxed. ON the way in, there was also a fabulous avenue of Gingko Biloba trees, leading up to the Palace, they looked so beautiful in their autumn colours. 

We then all headed over to the Goat Pub for fizzy and a grand chat! To read more, click on the link below.

https://www.bsac.com/news-and-blog/bsac-members-receive-duke-of-cambridge-award-kensington-palace/

Group shot, all people!

2018 Dive Season Ending Soon…..

The diving season is coming to an end on the East Coast is seems. The Autumn gales have started, and the underwater visibility is changing on a daily basis. On the 29th September a group of us tried to dive Gun Rocks, but the strong westerly winds kept us away having to dive the sheltered side of the islands instead. We had intended to check the trail and to undertake a thorough Seasearch survey of the site, but it was not to be. What we did discover is that the marker buoy has gone. Presumably blew off during the early September storm which swept through. We have therefore decided to leave the site without a marker until next year, probably early April…. So, if you wish to dive the site before then, you will have to use the GPS co-ordinates, and the map!

In other news, Gun Rocks has been selected as a topic for presentation at the Marine Archaeology Society Annual Conference in Newport, Wales 16-17 November 2018. For more information please click Here. The talk will be presented on the Sunday morning, and will be full of photos and some video, following the events of the last few years, photogrammetry, trail laying, mapping and having fun! Tickets are still for sale, so if you would like to go, it will be a lovely weekend full of interesting talks, and possibly some new projects….

Finally, apologies to anyone who has been on the site lately, the website that is, and has found that it was bereft of images and photos. It took a bit of “googling” but it seems that an update to Jet Pack managed to remove all my photos. Fingers crossed that it is all restored now. If you come on and find them gone again, do let me know. 

Nor-Fest Gun Rocks Presentation

On Saturday 28th July, I was asked to give a talk about the Gun Rocks project and the dive trail, for the “Nor-Fest” Festival.

The weekend was wet and windy with a lot of dives cancelled in the morning, so we wondered how many people would turn up to this afternoon event; held in the WI hall in Beadnell. Luckily, about 70 divers came, which made for a great evening. First up was Tyneside BSAC 114’s very own Richard Booth, who gave a well illustrated talk about some of the wrecks off the north east coast. This was followed by tea and cakes, then my talk on Gun Rocks. Everyone seemed to listen, and even asked a few questions at the end…. more importantly i was approached by someone who said that they might have a sward hilt in their caravan, and if they can find it they will give it to me – fantastic, fingers crossed that they find it! 

The following two talks were very different to each other, and no less interesting. One on the deeper wrecks of the east coast of Scotland – by Steve Sanders. he also brought with him a deep sea divers helmet which he had found on one of his dives; quite something. The final talk was given by Ben Burville and was all about seals and their behaviour. it was illustrated with lots of videos he had taken on and around the Farne Islands…. 

The final bit of news – we have the finalised laminated dive trail maps, so if you would like one, then do let me know. You can contact me through the contact form on this website. Happy diving! 🙂 

All that media!

Wow, what a few days it has been, the Gun Rocks Project has been featured in the local press with the Chronicle, Northern Echo and the Journal picking up on the story written by Deb, at Ceidiog Publicity, on behalf of BSAC. The story came about because BSAC are hoping to promote the use of hard boats by divers, under a campaign called Save Our Skippers (SOS). As we have used William Shiel’s boat Glad Tidings VII (skippered by Michael Craig) to access the site on numerous occasions, we thought it would be good to do some publicity, for this worthy cause. (Please note, other hard boats do exist as do other ports of departure!).  If clubs and individuals don’t organise trips and use hard boats for diving, then they will cease to operate and that would be a shame. 

If you missed the articles, then do click below:

In other news, the dive trail maps have been completed and have been sent to the printers. All we have to do now is identify the wreck! 🙂 

Gun Rocks Funding: 2017-2018 Report

The funding period for Gun Rocks is now over. The funds received from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Jubilee Trust had to be spent within the 12 month funding period. This was a challenge, what with the trail not being installed until May 2018, be we did succeed. In fact, over the last 12 months, this project has achieved almost everything it set out to do; though the origin of the wreck still remains a mystery! 

The CrowdFunding money was not time linked, so this money will be used for ongoing trail maintenance and website hosting costs. 

The Summary Report was written so that it could be amended accordingly then submitted to each of the funding sources to provide them with information on how their funding was spent and what the tangible outcomes of the project have been. It was also intended as a stand-along report, so that interested parties can find out what we have done during the funding period. The report has also been submitted for the 2018 Duke of Cambridge scuba prize…. (fingers crossed!). 

If you would like to read the summary report please click HERE! and it should download in PDF. Or visit the Reports Page, you can download it from there too. 

All it remains to do is say a huge thank you to everyone who donated. The project does have a legacy and will continue. Tyneside 114 BSAC, will continue to maintain the trail and the website for the foreseeable future.  We also hope that many many divers continue to use the dive trail, and that divers and non-divers alike enjoy learning about the cannon and the marine life of Gun Rocks. 

The dive trail is open!

Bank Holiday Monday – never good for traffic, and this day was no exception. The temperature on leaving home was 25oC. However, as we slowly eeeeked our way up the A1, the temperature begun to drop. Almost 2 hours later when we arrived in Seahouses, the temperature was only 15oC, much better for wearing a dry suit. We all kitted up and headed on to Glad Tidings VII, with Michael as our skipper. A merry band of 12 Tyneside 114 members, all to try out the new trail.

Sue above cannon 6012 the cannon in the gully.

The first dive was on North Wamseys, where Hanna did her Ocean Diver qualifying dive with Si Fish. The visibility was about 5 metres, with lots of marine life including a reluctant octopus. The second dive, after a shorter than normal surface interval (due to potential incoming fog, that didn’t arrive in the end) was on Gun Rocks.

We actually dived the site on slack which was great. Each buddy pair was given a map so that they could see that the trail was not circular, but fanned out in three directions from the central pile of three. Everyone was able to navigate around, and for some it was the first time they had actually seen the cannon (including some who had done the site before!). The visibility was about 5 metres which was great.

Sue looking for crabs in the muzzle of cannon 6008.

I was diving with Sue, so used her as a model, taking lots of photos for future publicity. We also took advantage of the slack to swim over a larger area than the trail. It is really evident towards the eastern end of the rock, how the storms have ripped up all of the kelp. There is just now a large pebble bed. Back on the other side of the trail, to the west, the kelp is fully intact and the short walls into the sound are still covered with life such as dead man’s fingers. We also took the opportunity to find the cannon which Si found last year, and to take some more photographs of it.

All of the photographs which I took, have been added to the Gallery section of this website. If anyone reading this post, has photos which they would like me to add, then please let me know – you can use the contact form, or my email if you have it.

The feedback from everyone was good. It seems that finally we may have a working dive trail, which will allow people to actually see the cannon in all of their glory. The maps will be updated and information put on the back about the cannon and the site in general. Once produced it can then be downloaded from the dive trail section of this website, for use in the field. In the meantime, the draft map can be downloaded here.